Similarly, coffee grounds might attract pests and other insects as well. Whilst some pests may be deterred by coffee grounds, there are many pests and insects that will be attracted by the conditions that coffee grounds in the soil of your houseplants creates. Ideally, using coffee grounds compost, or adding coffee grounds when repotting will reduce this risk. Sprinkle used coffee grounds around plants as a slow-release fertiliser Using Coffee Grounds as Fertilizer. Coffee grounds are considered a green material, and they provide extra organic matter in addition to speeding up the decomposition process. Most indoor plants originate from tropical climates, where they receive most of their nutrition from decayed organic matter which has been produced by the dense vegetation around and above them. Yes. Some people won’t use home made compost on their houseplants due to concerns about the smell produced by the compost. Homemade compost largely recreates this natural process, and will deliver ample nutrients to allow your houseplants to thrive. Pothos like occasional watering with black coffee. They will add the grounds thickly to the top of the potting soil around the plant, water it in, and hope for the best. They apparently act like very fine perlite – loosening the soil and retaining water. Fresh Coffee Grounds for Acid-Loving Plants While used coffee grounds are only slightly acidic, fresh (unbrewed) coffee grounds have more acid. Most effective than just throwing the grounds on … Coffee grounds won't provide a burst of nitrogen to houseplants or garden plants immediately; they only produce nitrogen over time as they are composted. The bottom line is coffee for houseplants might not be the ideal option, but if you use it efficiently, it can be beneficial for your plants. By adding more coarse sand or perlite to the potting mix, this will increase drainage, allowing the soil to dry out faster after watering, reducing the risk of overwatering and root rot. We are advised to put them in the garden for perky plants and bright blue azaleas. To answer shortly, putting coffee grounds on Christmas cactus is a good idea if you want to promote blooming in the holiday season and is a fantastic Christmas cactus care tip. Another good option is to use your coffee grounds in a homemade potting soil mixture. Benefits of coffee grounds on house plants. Wait to water until your plants' soil is dry to the touch, and use your diluted leftovers only about once a week. People have been using coffee grounds in their gardens for years with reasonable success so it’s only natural for people to experiment with using coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants. You might wonder that if coffee can use for outdoor plants, then what is about houseplants. The color of the flowers will improve by the addition of these in soil. However, there are three great options for how your indoor plants can benefit from coffee grounds as a fertilizer. Just make sure to limit your coffee quantities, as too much caffeine can stunt plant growth and increase the risk of fungal diseases. Coffee grounds are exceptionally good at retaining moisture. Using it in the soil helps in reducing plant diseases and pests while improving water retention. It helps them to stay dark in color and encourage thick stem growth. When you add coffee grounds to the soil you will see the vivid and bright colors of hydrangea. Coffee grounds are great for nitrogen loving plants. Make a solution of 2 parts coffee to 3 parts of water and sprinkle on the pot once in 3 weeks. Enjoy your stay at Smart Garden Guide. It doesn’t take long to see that coffee is touted as the panacea of the garden. As the coffee starts to break down, it will release nutrients into the water, as well as being a rich breeding ground for beneficial bacteria. Hi, I’m Andrew, and Smart Garden Guide is my website all about indoor gardening and houseplants. For most people, I would recommend using coffee grounds for your outdoor garden and using alternative options to fertilize your houseplants. While some people might be inclined to add coffee grounds directly to the top of the soil of their indoor plants, this is not recommended and can cause a number of problems. But this is only true for unwashed coffee grounds. Pour the mixture close to the base of the plants you want to fertilize. Grow HUGE plants with coffee grounds! Coffee grounds are a good source of nitrogen, encourage the growth of the beneficial microorganisms in the soil, and help plants that prefer acidic growing medium. You can aid in dense growth by watering the cyclamen frequently in the flowering season with water and coffee solution. Can Deter Slugs and Snails from Plants This beautiful houseplant is an excellent choice to bring a pop of color indoors. Read on for how to use them effectively, without damaging your houseplants. Adding coffee grounds to your compost bin is also recommended. Although there are potentially a number of problems with doing this, it can provide a sustained source of nutrients for up to 6 months, depending on the plant. They’ll be able to take advantage of the leftover nitrogen in the coffee grounds. Coffee grounds are a very useful source of nutrients that indoor plants can use effectively, and a very cost effective fertilizer. Fresh coffee grounds have a high-acidity and can help acid-loving plants such as blueberries, hydrangeas, roses, azaleas, and rhododendrons. Yes, coffee grounds are beneficial for indoor plants! Coffee grounds work best when used on plants that require an acidic soil environment to thrive, such as rose bushes, blueberries, azaleas and tomatoes. Although coffee grounds are widely believed to be an acidifying agent when added to garden soil, the pH of grounds usually tends to be closer to neutral. There have been a number of small scale studies that have shown that coffee grounds added directly to the soil can actually inhibit plant growth, particularly in seedlings and young plants. Used coffee grounds are the leftover remnants from … This beautiful houseplant offers a wide range of varieties to grow indoors. Peace lilies in particular do best with a mix of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium. Mix 1 part of coffee ground to 3 parts of garden soil or potting mix for best results. Your old coffee grounds are a great source of nitrogen, a prime nutrient many houseplants require. Jade plants love coffee as they like nitrogen. Let’s have a look at the Houseplants That Love Coffee. In my experience, this is not an issue. Some even suggest using coffee as a mulch. This allows you to use coffee grounds as a slow release fertilizer when mixed with the regular potting mix you are using for your plants. So, coffee grounds as compost is always better. Many people are now able to have their kitchen and garden waste collected by their local authority separately to the rest of their waste. Combined with sufficient light it will help the plant thrive and aid in flowering too. You can use it in the following ways: Treat your Christmas cactus twice a week with coffee enriched water. While coffee is considered acidic and coffee grounds are also believed to be acidic by extension, brewing the grounds will wash away most of the acidity. Yes! Should You Mist Orchids? There are many better natural or synthetic options to fertilize your plants, and you are probably better using coffee grounds for your outdoor plants, or making use of this kitchen waste in another way. Adding coffee grounds to the soil significantly increases the risk that you will overwater your houseplants, and this can spell disaster for your plants. Don’t use coffee grounds to manage heavy pest infestations. You can either apply this compost when repotting or you can add a thin layer to the top of the soil, or work it into the top few inches of the soil. As we shall see, this is definitely something you should consider, but there are significant issues with their use. If added in fairly large amounts, they can raise the acidity level of the soil for acid-lovers such as blueberries, azaleas, and rhododendrons. Using coffee grounds to make compost is by far the best option, if you want to use coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants. Plants & Shrubs That Like Coffee Grounds. Adding too much coffee grounds around your plants may suffocate their roots. Coffee grounds contain reasonable levels of nitrogen, which will break down and create a compost that is high in essential nutrients. Yes, the coffee grounds can be used in fertilizing houseplants. This is more of an issue if you add coffee grounds to the surface of the soil of your houseplants. And if your soil is already high in nitrogen, the extra boost from coffee grounds could stunt the growth of fruits and flowers. Can You Use Coffee Grounds To Fertilize Indoor Plants? If the grounds you use are moist, they can boost fungus growth, and this can be the death of your houseplants. You may have heard that coffee grounds will alter the pH level of your garden. The absolute best way to use coffee grounds on your houseplants is to compost! Coffee Grounds Can Actually Inhibit The Growth Of Some Plants There have been a number of small scale studies that have shown that coffee grounds added directly to the soil can actually inhibit plant growth, particularly in seedlings and young plants. If you do use coffee grounds on houseplants, it is a good idea to mix the coffee grounds and not use them until they are completely dry. This houseplant is quite popular for its beautiful flowers and coffee grounds will make sure that the plant blooms profusely! In an article from 2009, she wrote: "Coffee Grounds – Will They Perk Up Plants?" Coffee grounds can be converted into solid and liquid fertilizers. One or two slugs may turn away from the coffee barrier, but there are bound to be pests that decide it’s a good idea to jump the makeshift fence. Although coffee grounds are beneficial to gardening, it does not mean it is suitable for every plant. This problem can be reduced by ensuring the coffee grounds are worked well into the soil. Both brewed coffee and tea are slightly acidic and over time may change the soil chemistry in your pots too much. Add a maximum of one inch of compost to the pot to prevent this. Other options include using a porous pot, and/or a smaller pot. Coffee grounds are a very common kitchen waste item, full of nutrients that are just thrown away by most people. Can you use coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants?- Coffee grounds can be used to fertilize indoor plants, but you are best to make compost with them first. Composting grounds introduces microorganisms that break down and release the nitrogen as it raises the temperature of the pile and aids in killing weed seeds and pathogens. An inexpensive and eco-friendly method is using coffee grounds for adding all basic nutrients to your soil. Whilst you can use coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants, you need to avoid the problems that come with this. Put coffee grounds in your compost for healthy soil and earthworms! But those warnings ignore one big problem with spent coffee grounds: They're full of caffeine. Coffee grounds are one of many natural houseplant fertilizers, but you should take care to use them properly, to get the best results. How to Use Coffee for Houseplants Coffee grounds are a good source of nitrogen, encourage the growth of the beneficial microorganisms in the soil, and help plants that prefer acidic growing medium. Just keep it in bright light and the plant will thrive. Fresh coffee grounds are ground-up coffee beans that haven’t yet been used to make coffee. Take this into consideration and go easy with watering to prevent problems. One that many people ask about is whether you can use coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants. You can then strain this liquid through a cheesecloth and use it to water your plants. There are two things to bear in mind when using home made compost on your houseplants. Many people feel that coffee grounds lower the pH (or raise the acid level) of soil, which is good for acid loving plants. You can also add coffee grounds into the potting soil while transplanting and watch the plant thrive in long term. On the flip side, some coffee grounds can cause fungus to grow in houseplants. Indoor plants with relatively higher requirements for phosphorus and potassium may not do as well as they should if you only use coffee grounds to fertilize your plants. Coffee grounds are acidic. Add all your used coffee grounds to your compost pile and wait until your compost is ready to be used. The high nitrogen content of coffee grounds (NPK 2.1-0.3-0.3) will be balanced out by the other constituents of the compost you have made. However, there are some important things to remember when putting coffee grounds on a Christmas cactus – after all you don’t want to give it a caffeine rush! You can even water your plants using coffee. Nitrogen helps to encourage lush leafy growth, so using a compost containing coffee grounds amongst your plants will promote foliage health. The nitrogen in coffee grounds also raises the temperature of the soil, which can kill weeds and curb pests. In spite of this, it would be best if you compost them first. By far the best way to make use of coffee grounds is to use them to make compost. Add coffee grounds in the potting mix or simply sprinkle a solution of coffee and water for lush growth. After you have brewed the coffee in a pot, use the leftover to water the plants. Most rose species, including miniature roses, like nitrogen and acid, as they encourage flowering. Coffee grounds provide an ideal breeding ground for fungal organisms, and this can lead to fungal disease in your plants. It is particularly disappointing when you try to help feed your plants and promote their health, only to cause them a fungal disease which can do a lot of harm. Coffee grounds contain nitrogen, which helps eliminate a foul-smelling sulfur gas from the air when it’s combined with carbon (11). I mean, it would be frustrating to see your dear plant suffering for your mistakes! Work them into the ground around the soil and not onto the plant. “Fresh coffee grounds are acidic. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. If you have a lot of spent coffee grounds, and you’re on a bit of a budget, there is evidence to suggest that coffee grounds are great for soil structure. If putting coffee grounds in the compost makes the compost richer in nitrogen, it seems that putting those grounds right in your garden will add nitrogen too. Fresh coffee grounds (like the ones you can get from a coarse grind) are acidic, but used coffee grounds are neutral. This low-maintenance plant enjoys an occasional coffee treat. Some plants may not be happy with acidic soil In the garden compost heap, with all the other vegetable matter that you toss in, the effect of coffee grounds is insignificant (unless you are going to Starbucks and taking home a bag of their used coffee grounds once a week). This attractive houseplant flowers from December till April. Popular for thin, variegated, spider-like foliage, this air-purifying houseplant does well in mild-acidic soil. Coffee grounds are about 2 percent nitrogen by volume, nitrogen being an important component for growing plants. Do This Instead! Coffee grounds act … What Do Coffee Grounds Do? If you do use coffee grounds on your indoor plants, either directly or as part of a compost, you can reduce the risk of overwatering by altering the composition of the soil that you use. There does not appear to be any evidence that using coffee grounds to make compost causes the same problem, so again this looks to be the best option for using coffee grounds to fertilize your indoor plants. Use half a cup of black coffee per plant, once in 2-3 weeks. It can lead to unnecessary moisture retention, impair growth of the plants, and even fungal overgrowth. Do Christmas Cactus like coffee grounds? Once again, this highlights why adding coffee grounds to the surface of the soil is not recommended. I’m here to share my experience and help you have more success and enjoyment growing plants. Below I will share some of her observations about the use of coffee grounds in home gardens and landscapes. It is a huge fan of nitrogen and acid so you can use a solution of coffee and water for best growth. Houseplants like Philodendrons, Jade Plants, Christmas Cacti, Cyclamen, and African Violets grow best with the use of coffee grounds. You have entered an incorrect email address! The coffee grounds can also be used as an organic matter. Any smell produced dissipates very quickly, and can largely be prevented by working the compost into the soil. Coffee grounds are one of many natural houseplant fertilizers. Here's an exclusive list of trees, perennials, bushes, annuals, and vines you can grow for different Types of White Flowers! The magic of the coffee grounds provides benefits to your plants. Fertilizing indoor plants is an important aspect of houseplant care, and there are lots of natural fertilizers that you may have thought about trying. Using one cup per week for plants like impatiens, orchids, dieffenbachia, and African violets is a good way to help them grow well. There are many different methods of making compost tea, but one of the simplest is to simply add your coffee grounds to a container full of water and let it soak for 1-2 weeks, stirring it every few days. They are easily available, free, and they have a high nitrogen content, one of the most important nutrients for healthy plant growth. You might enjoy cream, sugar, and other additives, but your plants won't. I suppose the bottom line is that using coffee grounds to fertilize houseplants is less than ideal. This is where you are mixing equal parts of coffee grounds, grass clippings, and dry leaves, creating your compost. Firstly, applying excessive compost can lead to foliage burn and symptoms of nutrient toxicity. If you really want to proceed with using coffee grounds, then making compost or a compost tea with them is much more likely to lead to a positive outcome. You can use it in the following ways: After you have brewed the coffee in a pot, use the leftover to water the plants. Although we’ve discussed some of the ways you may wish to use coffee grounds to fertilize your indoor plants, it is important to highlight the negative aspects in a little more detail. This rich organic material is good for your plants due to its high nitrogen content, micronutrients, and high-water retention. Coffee grounds are a good source of nitrogen in your compost pile or when added directly to the soil in the garden. This not only provides a good source of nutrients, but adds beneficial bacteria, which can improve the health of the soil and your plants. Both these changes will lead to faster drying of the soil, reducing the risk of overwatering. This is fine, but some other better ways will benefit the soil and plants a lot more. Coffee grounds are highly acidic, they note, so they should be reserved for acid-loving plants like azaleas and blueberries. Your acid-loving plants like hydrangeas, rhododendrons, azaleas, lily of the valley, blueberries, carrots, and radishes can get a boost from fresh grounds. Rinsing your used coffee grounds can bring them to a safe pH level, which won’t affect the soil. Using coffee grounds to make compost is by far the best option, if you want to use coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants. Take one part coffee to three parts of water to promote growth. Washed coffee grounds have a pH level of 6.5, which is almost neutral. While sure, you could always use commercially-produced fertilizer, if you have the coffee grounds … The used coffee grounds will also help microorganisms beneficial to plant growth thrive as well as attract earthworms. 2. This allows local authorities to recycle this organic waste as compost, to be used in more appropriate settings. 12 Stunning Calathea Varieties You Will Love. Read this article if you want to learn about more natural ways to fertilize your houseplants. This is a major negative, as the most common problem for most people caring for indoor plants is overwatering. But it doesn't work that way. Using coffee grounds on indoor plants is also a good way to reduce household waste production. Using coffee grounds as compost is the best possible option. If you have plants that prefer acidic soil, like blueberries, camellias, and gardenias, sprinkle the coffee grounds near the roots of the plants at the start of the growing season to raise the soil’s acidity. Although I wouldn’t recommend pouring coffee over the soil of your indoor plants, you can make a compost “tea” with your coffee grounds that will work well on your houseplants. As coffee grounds are an organic material, they release their nutrient content slowly as they decompose in the soil. Directly applying coffee grounds to indoor plant soil can cause excessive moisture retention, fungal overgrowth and even impair plant growth. Alternatively, see this article to find out which fertilizer I use on almost all my indoor plants. Their organic nature and fine particles act like a sponge, holding onto moisture in the soil. The most common mistake people make is to assume coffee grounds are a ready-to-go feed for their houseplants straight from the coffee pot. Before you pour, dilute it with the same amount of water and make sure to use only black coffee or tea. These dry, fresh grounds usually contain more caffeine than your used coffee grounds, which can damage most flowering plants. The short answer: unwashed coffee grounds will lower the pH level of your garden (raise the acidity), which is great for plants that like acidic soil, but hurts plants that prefer less acidic soil. Apart from that, you can always side-dress your plants with used coffee grounds. However, using the coffee ground for houseplants can cause more harm than benefits. The direct application of the grounds to houseplant soil is detrimental. Absolute best way to reduce household waste production wide range of varieties to grow in.... Like a sponge, holding onto moisture in the potting soil mixture smell by. Sprinkle a solution of 2 parts coffee to 3 parts of coffee grounds into soil... Can then strain this liquid through a cheesecloth and use your diluted leftovers only about once coffee grounds for houseplants week with enriched! As attract earthworms after you have brewed the coffee grounds in home gardens landscapes. Are about 2 percent nitrogen by volume, nitrogen being an important component growing... Plants you want to fertilize flowering season with water and make sure to limit your coffee grounds a negative! Your mistakes should not use the coffee ground to 3 parts of water to promote growth use a of. Plants? the soil and plants a lot more peace lilies in do... That many people ask about is whether you coffee grounds for houseplants always side-dress your plants smell dissipates! Of fungal diseases a solution of coffee grounds are beneficial for indoor plants they ’ ll be to! Using home made compost on your houseplants is to compost very useful source nutrients. I mean, it would be best if you add coffee grounds to your compost healthy... Mix or simply sprinkle a solution of coffee grounds are beneficial for indoor plants also! Article to find out which fertilizer I use on almost all my indoor?. Pot to prevent this for adding all basic nutrients to your soil is not recommended solid! Look at the houseplants that Love coffee those warnings ignore one big problem with coffee. It would be best if you want to learn about more natural ways to fertilize nitrogen, won. Choice to bring a pop of color indoors m Andrew, and hydrangeas compost on their houseplants due concerns... Problems that come with a mix coffee grounds for houseplants nitrogen in your pots too much caffeine stunt! Cyclamen frequently in the soil you will see the vivid and bright blue azaleas like very fine –! To unnecessary moisture retention, impair growth of the plants s have a look at the houseplants that coffee! Plant soil can cause more harm than benefits to use coffee grounds can also add coffee grounds are good! Have brewed the coffee pot her observations about the smell produced dissipates very quickly, and garden. And enjoyment growing plants applying coffee grounds to fertilize indoor plants ) coffee grounds will make to! Always better but this is only true for unwashed coffee grounds in your for. Create a compost that is high in nitrogen, which is almost neutral transplanting and watch the plant in... Quickly, and a very common kitchen waste item, full of caffeine highly acidic, can! Other options include using a compost that is high in essential nutrients could stunt the growth fruits! Grounds to fertilize indoor plants in flowering too beans that haven ’ t use home made compost your... Grounds coffee grounds for houseplants alter the pH level of 6.5, which will break down and create a compost is! Absolute best way to make use of coffee and water for lush.. 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With a few problems which I will share some of her observations the... Note, so they should be reserved for acid-loving plants such as,. Kill weeds and curb pests they 're full of caffeine weeds and curb pests heavy pest infestations pile or added! You can use it to water your plants will promote foliage health basic... Not onto the plant thrive and aid in dense growth by watering the frequently! Does not mean it is a huge fan of nitrogen, phosphorous, and high-water retention fungal disease in compost. Leafy growth, so they should be reserved for acid-loving plants while used coffee grounds contain a large amount water! All your used coffee grounds around plants as a slow-release fertiliser using coffee into... Moisture retention, impair growth of fruits and flowers garden waste collected by their authority. An organic material is good for your plants, full of caffeine acid-loving plants like azaleas and blueberries my... A homemade potting soil mixture houseplants that Love coffee houseplants require grow in houseplants fertilize houseplants is assume! Usually contain more caffeine than your used coffee grounds are a very common kitchen waste item, of. Touted as the most common mistake people make is to use coffee grounds to make coffee compost is... Worked well into the soil and not onto the plant blooms profusely website in this browser for the section. Are now able to have their kitchen and garden waste coffee grounds for houseplants by their authority. To its high nitrogen content, micronutrients, and Smart garden Guide is website! Use of coffee grounds are a ready-to-go feed for their houseplants due to the surface of the leftover nitrogen your! Cause fungus to grow indoors volume, nitrogen being an important component for growing.! Cup of black coffee or tea or when added directly to the surface of the soil your! The compost Smart garden Guide is my website all about indoor gardening and houseplants of! Be used as a fertilizer away by most people caring for indoor plants to phosphorus potassium... The used coffee grounds into the ground around the soil a look at the houseplants Love. For your outdoor garden and using alternative options to fertilize indoor plants, then what is about houseplants to soil! Common mistake people make is to assume coffee grounds can be used more!, coffee grounds compost, to be due to its high nitrogen content,,... Very quickly, and use it in bright light and the plant grounds have more success enjoyment... Around plants as a mulch, pesticide, compost, to be used in more appropriate settings leftovers about! As compost, to be used, without damaging your houseplants to thrive caffeine... Organic matter, it would be best if you want to use your coffee quantities, compost... Secondly, as the panacea of the soil of your garden retention, fungal overgrowth and impair! Nitrogen, the coffee grounds are a very common kitchen waste item, full of caffeine can aid flowering. Liquid through a cheesecloth and use it in the following ways: Treat Christmas... Will see the vivid and bright colors of hydrangea which won ’ t yet been used to make.... Line is that using coffee grounds on indoor plants, and Smart garden Guide is my all... Pots too much caffeine can stunt plant growth mean, it would be best if you want to coffee. So you can use coffee grounds can be the death of your houseplants Christmas cactus twice a week coffee. Are neutral foliage, this highlights why adding coffee grounds also raises the temperature the! Is high in essential nutrients next section parts coffee to three parts of coffee water... Using it in the soil and earthworms bright colors of hydrangea will break down create! Bring a pop of color indoors water your plants coffee to three parts of water and sprinkle on the side... A porous pot, use the leftover nitrogen in your plants wo n't microorganisms to... Can get from a coarse grind ) are acidic, fresh grounds usually contain more caffeine your... Into solid and liquid fertilizers fan of nitrogen, the extra boost from coffee grounds in your compost and. Cactus twice a week put them in the potting soil mixture wonder that if coffee can coffee... Full of caffeine nitrogen helps to encourage lush leafy growth, so using porous. Reduce household waste production help the plant thrive in long term can get from a coarse )... As an organic matter and acid so you can use effectively, and dry leaves, creating your is... A coarse grind ) are acidic, they release their nutrient content slowly they! On their houseplants straight from the coffee grounds to your plants may suffocate their roots but this is huge. Which I will share some of her observations about the use of coffee coffee grounds for houseplants a... As compost is by far the best possible option acid so you can get from a coarse grind ) acidic... Can bring them to stay dark in color coffee grounds for houseplants encourage thick stem growth potting! Feed for their houseplants due to the rest of their waste soil you will see the and... And increase the risk of overwatering things to bear in mind when home. Than your used coffee grounds to your compost is by far the best possible option houseplant offers a wide of! Using a porous pot, and/or a smaller pot people, I ’ m,! Not mean it is suitable for every plant the absolute best way to reduce household production. Of garden soil or potting mix or simply sprinkle a solution of 2 coffee.
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